Freedom of Expression, the Media and Journalists: Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights external link

McGonagle, T. & Voorhoof, D.
European Audiovisual Observatory, 2023, Strasbourg, Edition: 8th , ISBN: 9789287184351

Abstract

This e-book provides valuable insights into the European Court of Human Rights’ extensive case-law on freedom of expression and media and journalistic freedoms. The first seven editions of the e-book (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2020, 2021 and 2022) have proved hugely successful. The new seventh edition summarises over 378 judgments or decisions by the Court and provides hyperlinks to the full text of each of the summarised judgments or decisions (via HUDOC, the Court's online case-law database).

Freedom of expression, Journalism, Media law

Bibtex

Book{nokey, title = {Freedom of Expression, the Media and Journalists: Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights}, author = {McGonagle, T. and Voorhoof, D.}, url = {https://rm.coe.int/iris-themes-vol-iii-8th-edition-april-2023-/1680ab1d11}, year = {2023}, date = {2023-04-24}, abstract = {This e-book provides valuable insights into the European Court of Human Rights’ extensive case-law on freedom of expression and media and journalistic freedoms. The first seven editions of the e-book (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2020, 2021 and 2022) have proved hugely successful. The new seventh edition summarises over 378 judgments or decisions by the Court and provides hyperlinks to the full text of each of the summarised judgments or decisions (via HUDOC, the Court\'s online case-law database).}, keywords = {Freedom of expression, Journalism, Media law}, }

Towards a Normative Perspective on Journalistic
AI: Embracing the Messy Reality of Normative
Ideals
download

Helberger, N., Drunen, M. van, Möller, J., Vrijenhoek, S. & Eskens, S.
Digital Journalism, vol. 10, iss. : 10, pp: 1605-1626, 2022

Abstract

Few would disagree that AI systems and applications need to be “responsible,” but what is “responsible” and how to answer that question? Answering that question requires a normative perspective on the role of journalistic AI and the values it shall serve. Such a perspective needs to be grounded in a broader normative framework and a thorough understanding of the dynamics and complexities of journalistic AI at the level of people, newsrooms and media markets. This special issue aims to develop such a normative perspective on the use of AI-driven tools in journalism and the role of digital journalism studies in advancing that perspective. The contributions in this special issue combine conceptual, organisational and empirical angles to study the challenges involved in actively using AI to promote editorial values, the powers at play, the role of economic and regulatory conditions, and ways of bridging academic ideals and the messy reality of the real world. This editorial brings the different contributions into conversation, situates them in the broader digital journalism studies scholarship and identifies seven key-take aways.

Artificial intelligence, governance, Journalism, Media law, normative perspective, professional values, Regulation

Bibtex

Article{nokey, title = {Towards a Normative Perspective on JournalisticAI: Embracing the Messy Reality of NormativeIdeals}, author = {Helberger, N. and Drunen, M. van and Möller, J. and Vrijenhoek, S. and Eskens, S.}, url = {https://www.ivir.nl/publications/towards-a-normative-perspective-on-journalisticai-embracing-the-messy-reality-of-normativeideals/digital_journalism_2022_10/}, doi = {https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2022.2152195}, year = {2022}, date = {2022-12-22}, journal = {Digital Journalism}, volume = {10}, issue = {10}, pages = {1605-1626}, abstract = {Few would disagree that AI systems and applications need to be “responsible,” but what is “responsible” and how to answer that question? Answering that question requires a normative perspective on the role of journalistic AI and the values it shall serve. Such a perspective needs to be grounded in a broader normative framework and a thorough understanding of the dynamics and complexities of journalistic AI at the level of people, newsrooms and media markets. This special issue aims to develop such a normative perspective on the use of AI-driven tools in journalism and the role of digital journalism studies in advancing that perspective. The contributions in this special issue combine conceptual, organisational and empirical angles to study the challenges involved in actively using AI to promote editorial values, the powers at play, the role of economic and regulatory conditions, and ways of bridging academic ideals and the messy reality of the real world. This editorial brings the different contributions into conversation, situates them in the broader digital journalism studies scholarship and identifies seven key-take aways.}, keywords = {Artificial intelligence, governance, Journalism, Media law, normative perspective, professional values, Regulation}, }

Contribution to the public consultation on the European Media Freedom Act external link

Abstract

The announcement of the European Media Freedom Act (EMFA) has provided an important impulse for the development of new legal rules seeking to safeguard and support a free and pluralistic media environment in the European Union (EU). As indicated by Commissioners Věra Jourov  and Thierry Breton, the initiative is set to address a wide range of persisting challenges faced by European media outlets, including political and economic pressures, unjustified interference with editorial independence, failing business models supporting journalism and issues surrounding media pluralism. Considering the broad spectrum of concerns and the centrality of a pluralist media environment for the health of democracies, the European Commission’s commitment to the EMFA is commendable and urgent. With this submission, we would like to take the opportunity to respond to the European Commission’s public consultation on the EMFA.

European Media Freedom Act, favourable environment, frontpage, indepen, independence, Journalism, media freedom, media plurality, news publisher

Bibtex

Article{Rucz2022b, title = {Contribution to the public consultation on the European Media Freedom Act}, author = {Rucz, M. and Irion, K. and Senftleben, M.}, url = {https://www.ivir.nl/position-paper-european-media-freedom-act-consultation-2/}, year = {0328}, date = {2022-03-28}, abstract = {The announcement of the European Media Freedom Act (EMFA) has provided an important impulse for the development of new legal rules seeking to safeguard and support a free and pluralistic media environment in the European Union (EU). As indicated by Commissioners Věra Jourov  and Thierry Breton, the initiative is set to address a wide range of persisting challenges faced by European media outlets, including political and economic pressures, unjustified interference with editorial independence, failing business models supporting journalism and issues surrounding media pluralism. Considering the broad spectrum of concerns and the centrality of a pluralist media environment for the health of democracies, the European Commission’s commitment to the EMFA is commendable and urgent. With this submission, we would like to take the opportunity to respond to the European Commission’s public consultation on the EMFA.}, keywords = {European Media Freedom Act, favourable environment, frontpage, indepen, independence, Journalism, media freedom, media plurality, news publisher}, }

Journalistische Schreibwerkstatt für Schüler mit Migrationshintergrund external link

Migranten als Journalisten? Eine Studie zu Berufsperspektiven in der Einwanderungsgesellschaft, Pöttker, H. and Kiesewetter, C. and Lofink, J. (eds): Migranten als Journalisten? Eine Studie zu Berufsperspektiven in der Einwanderungsgesellschaft. Springer VS, 0101, pp: 128-137

immigration, Journalism, journalistic profession, migration

Bibtex

Chapter{Bastian2016c, title = {Journalistische Schreibwerkstatt für Schüler mit Migrationshintergrund}, author = {Bastian, M.}, year = {0101}, date = {2016-01-01}, keywords = {immigration, Journalism, journalistic profession, migration}, }

Einstellungen von Jugendlichen mit Migrationshintergrund zum Journalistenberuf external link

Migranten als Journalisten? Eine Studie zu Berufsperspektiven in der Einwanderungsgesellschaft, Pöttker, H. and Kiesewetter, C. and Lofink, J. (eds): Migranten als Journalisten? Eine Studie zu Berufsperspektiven in der Einwanderungsgesellschaft. Springer VS, 0101, pp: 128-137

immigration, Journalism, journalistic profession, migration

Bibtex

Chapter{Bastian2016b, title = {Einstellungen von Jugendlichen mit Migrationshintergrund zum Journalistenberuf}, author = {Bastian, M.}, year = {0101}, date = {2016-01-01}, keywords = {immigration, Journalism, journalistic profession, migration}, }

The Ukraine Conflict and the European Media: A Comparative Study of Newspapers in 13 European countries external link

Fengler, S., Kreutler, M., Alku, M., Barlovac, B., Bastian, M. & et al.
Journalism, vol. 5, 2018

Comparative research, content analysis, foreign correspondence, Journalism, Ukraine crisis

Bibtex

Article{Fengler2018b, title = {The Ukraine Conflict and the European Media: A Comparative Study of Newspapers in 13 European countries}, author = {Fengler, S. and Kreutler, M. and Alku, M. and Barlovac, B. and Bastian, M. and et al.}, doi = {https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884918774311}, year = {0101}, date = {2018-01-01}, journal = {Journalism}, volume = {5}, pages = {}, keywords = {Comparative research, content analysis, foreign correspondence, Journalism, Ukraine crisis}, }

‘Fake news’ and online disinformation: Case study – Belgium external link

2018

Abstract

This case study provides an overview of the ‘fake news’ phenomenon in Belgium. In light of the 2018 Reuters Report, it starts by sketching the present media landscape in Belgium. It then enquires whether Belgians are concerned about ‘fake news’; what their level of trust is in the media; which media sources are favoured by them, and what their level of media literacy is. After analysing these facts and figures, the emergence of ‘fake news’, through foreign political events, is discussed. Different examples of Belgian ‘fake news’ are then presented, which range from ‘hoaxes’ to misleading and inaccurate news articles stemming from qualified journalists. By means of these examples, the ambiguities of the term ‘fake news’, as an umbrella term to cover a wide variety of content, are explained. Given the vagueness of the term, it is submitted that ‘disinformation’ is a more appropriate term to use. Having regard to the possible impact of this type of ‘news’ on democracy, this case study strives to shed light on Belgian politicians and their relation with ‘fake news’. By means of examples, the author argues that they increasingly use the term ‘fake news’ to discredit news media. Moreover, they tend to by-pass traditional media, through their social media accounts, thereby contributing to the emergence of ‘fake news’. The lack of editorial oversight on social media allows for false messages to be spread. In order to propose measures to counter ‘fake news’ in Belgium, the case study provides an overview of different responses that have already been put in place. Besides responses at the EU level (including the Council of Europe), the overview includes governmental responses, news media responses, civil society responses and responses stemming from collaborations with IT companies. Taking account of these measures, various recommendations are proposed in the Conclusion. It is argued that both short and long-term actions should be developed. Having regard to the forthcoming Belgian elections, the former would be necessary and should, inter alia, aim to enhance the transparency of social media platforms. Regarding the latter, it is argued that media literacy measures should be further built upon.

België, case study, disinformation, Fake news, Journalism, Media law

Bibtex

Article{Coche2018e, title = {‘Fake news’ and online disinformation: Case study – Belgium}, author = {Coche, E.}, url = {https://www.ivir.nl/publicaties/download/Case-study-Fake-News-Belgium.pdf}, year = {0719}, date = {2018-07-19}, abstract = {This case study provides an overview of the ‘fake news’ phenomenon in Belgium. In light of the 2018 Reuters Report, it starts by sketching the present media landscape in Belgium. It then enquires whether Belgians are concerned about ‘fake news’; what their level of trust is in the media; which media sources are favoured by them, and what their level of media literacy is. After analysing these facts and figures, the emergence of ‘fake news’, through foreign political events, is discussed. Different examples of Belgian ‘fake news’ are then presented, which range from ‘hoaxes’ to misleading and inaccurate news articles stemming from qualified journalists. By means of these examples, the ambiguities of the term ‘fake news’, as an umbrella term to cover a wide variety of content, are explained. Given the vagueness of the term, it is submitted that ‘disinformation’ is a more appropriate term to use. Having regard to the possible impact of this type of ‘news’ on democracy, this case study strives to shed light on Belgian politicians and their relation with ‘fake news’. By means of examples, the author argues that they increasingly use the term ‘fake news’ to discredit news media. Moreover, they tend to by-pass traditional media, through their social media accounts, thereby contributing to the emergence of ‘fake news’. The lack of editorial oversight on social media allows for false messages to be spread. In order to propose measures to counter ‘fake news’ in Belgium, the case study provides an overview of different responses that have already been put in place. Besides responses at the EU level (including the Council of Europe), the overview includes governmental responses, news media responses, civil society responses and responses stemming from collaborations with IT companies. Taking account of these measures, various recommendations are proposed in the Conclusion. It is argued that both short and long-term actions should be developed. Having regard to the forthcoming Belgian elections, the former would be necessary and should, inter alia, aim to enhance the transparency of social media platforms. Regarding the latter, it is argued that media literacy measures should be further built upon.}, keywords = {België, case study, disinformation, Fake news, Journalism, Media law}, }

Open Journalism: The Road Travelled and the Road Ahead external link

McGonagle, T., Fahy, R., Kostić, B., Klus, M., Plaizier, C. & Hanhart, M.
2018

frontpage, Journalism, Media law

Bibtex

Report{McGonagle2018c, title = {Open Journalism: The Road Travelled and the Road Ahead}, author = {McGonagle, T. and Fahy, R. and Kostić, B. and Klus, M. and Plaizier, C. and Hanhart, M.}, url = {https://www.osce.org/representative-on-freedom-of-media/384432?download=true}, year = {0622}, date = {2018-06-22}, keywords = {frontpage, Journalism, Media law}, }

Freedom of Expression, the Media and Journalists: Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights external link

McGonagle, T. & Voorhoof, D.
0517

Abstract

This e-book provides valuable insights into the European Court of Human Rights’ extensive case-law on freedom of expression and media and journalistic freedoms. With well over 30,000 downloads, the first three editions of the e-book (2013, 2015 and 2016) have proved hugely successful. The new fourth edition summarises over 270 judgments or decisions by the Court and provides hyperlinks to the full text of each of the summarised judgments or decisions (via HUDOC, the Court's online case-law database). For an optimal navigational experience, one should download the e-book and read the technical tips on p. 3.

case law, European Court of Human Rights, Freedom of expression, frontpage, Journalism, Media law

Bibtex

Book{McGonagle2018, title = {Freedom of Expression, the Media and Journalists: Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights}, author = {McGonagle, T. and Voorhoof, D.}, url = {https://rm.coe.int/freedom-of-expression-the-media-and-journalists-iris-themes-vol-iii-de/16807c1181}, year = {0517}, date = {2018-05-17}, abstract = {This e-book provides valuable insights into the European Court of Human Rights’ extensive case-law on freedom of expression and media and journalistic freedoms. With well over 30,000 downloads, the first three editions of the e-book (2013, 2015 and 2016) have proved hugely successful. The new fourth edition summarises over 270 judgments or decisions by the Court and provides hyperlinks to the full text of each of the summarised judgments or decisions (via HUDOC, the Court\'s online case-law database). For an optimal navigational experience, one should download the e-book and read the technical tips on p. 3.}, keywords = {case law, European Court of Human Rights, Freedom of expression, frontpage, Journalism, Media law}, }